Mycology Research - Fungi, Diseases, Identification, Microscopy

Mycology Research Today is a free monthly online journal that collates and summarizes the latest research about Mycology, including details on fungi, diseases, identification, microscopy.


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Evolution of protein indels in plants, animals and fungi.

Ajawatanawong P, Baldauf SL

Published 5 July 2013 in BMC Evol Biol, 13(1): 140.
Full-text of this article is available online (may require subscription).


Articles on Mycology published 5 July 2013:

Insights into enzyme secretion by filamentous fungi: Comparative proteome analysis of Trichoderma reesei grown on different carbon sources.   J Proteomics.

[Abstract] [Full-text]

Heterogeneity in the mycelium: implications for the use of fungi as cell factories.   Biotechnol Lett, 35(8): 1155-64.

Fungi are widely used as cell factories for the production of pharmaceutical compounds, enzymes and metabolites. Fungi form colonies that consist of a network of hyphae. During the last two decades it has become clear that fungal colonies within a liquid culture are heterogeneous in size and gene expression. Heterogeneity in growth, secretion, and RNA composition can even be found between and within zones of colonies. These findings imply that productivity in a bioreactor may be increased by ... [Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Mycology published 4 July 2013:

Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.   PLoS One, 8(6): e66832.

Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi ... [Abstract] [Full-text]

Diversity of cultivable fungi associated with Antarctic marine sponges and screening for their antimicrobial, antitumoral and antioxidant potential.   World J Microbiol Biotechnol.

[Abstract] [Full-text]

Relatedness among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi drives plant growth and intraspecific fungal coexistence.   ISME J.

[Abstract] [Full-text]


Articles on Mycology published 3 July 2013:

Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on Agrostis capillaris grown on amended mine tailing substrate at pot, lysimeter, and field plot scales.   Environ Sci Pollut Res Int.

[Abstract] [Full-text]

The versatility of peroxisome function in filamentous fungi.   Subcell Biochem, 69: 135-52.

Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and versatile cell organelles. They consist of a single membrane that encloses a proteinaceous matrix. Conserved functions are fatty acid β-oxidation and hydrogen peroxide metabolism. In filamentous fungi, many other metabolic functions have been identified. Also, they contain highly specialized peroxisome-derived structures termed Woronin bodies, which have a structural function in plugging septal pores in order to prevent cytoplasmic bleeding of damaged hyphae.In ... [Abstract] [Full-text]

Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides Thanatin(S) in Transgenic Arabidopsis Enhanced Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria.   Gene.

[Abstract] [Full-text]


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Advances in Food Mycology (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology)

Advances in Food Mycology (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology)